4 WAYS TO MEASURE MOBILE APP USER HAPPINESS

4 WAYS TO MEASURE MOBILE APP USER HAPPINESS

For starters, all the engagement metrics such as retention rate, churn rate, total life time value and average
session intervals are a fair indicator of how users feel about your app. However, for a more defined,
measurable result, you need something more.
The most used metric is the Net Promoter Score or NPS, which measures customer satisfaction and
loyalty. It involved asking the user to fill out a survey indicating their satisfaction level. All the other
ways to gauge user happiness too primarily hinge on surveys and feedback forms.
As Tomer Sharon, Head of User Research and Metrics, Goldman Sachs, puts it,
“User happiness is a self-reported metric, which means you have to ask people to rate their happiness
rather than tracking their behavior”.
So that’s what you do – you ask your users how happy they are with you. Ratings, surveys and other
creative ways to get feedback are the most direct and effective tools to measure user happiness. But doing
feedback well is an art you must skillfully master. Asking the wrong people the wrong questions at the
wrong times could do more harm than help.
1. Feedback Best Practices
Now it is a well established fact that people aren’t thrilled about filling out surveys. From a user’s
perspective, surveys are a lot of hard work. Deciding whether they are slightly happy or moderately happy
is a dilemma. All such surveys are a ton of cognitive load you cannot expect users to willfully accept.
You need to make it easy, fun and probably rewarding for them to provide you the feedback you really
need. So here are a few feedback best practices you need to follow:
2. Bite Only What You Can Chew
Always ask questions only when you are seriously interested in acting on them. Don’t ask a user if they
would like an advanced in-app search experience, if you aren’t actually planning to develop it in the
future.
3. Keep Surveys Short
Can you pack a punch in a one-question survey? It’s a win if you can, really. No one likes too many
questions.But the one question can’t just be – how happy are you with this app? It has to be more precise.
Something aimed at a particular function or feature, like “Are you happy with the new share feature?”
4. Incentivize Feedback
If you really need some feedback that users are reluctant to respond to (maybe because it’s rather
long’ish), you can nudge them by offering incentives like a month free of premium, or extra game points.
You could call it incentive, or genuine reward for their time, but a few little freebies can really make
customers feel better about providing feedback.

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